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Archive for the ‘Spirit’ Category

la belle Verte

In All, Cinema, Spirit on May 8, 2013 at 5:45 pm

la belle Verte

Made in France in 1996 this obscure yet deeply significant film was banned in its homecountry and in Russia for reasons unknown. It was largely ignored by the rest of the world.

Using a whimsical, almost amateurish touch it raises profound questions about our inter-connectedness, humanity and self-actualization. It also boasts two of the funniest scenes captured on film, one involving a classical orchestra gone haywire and the other a football match turning into Swan Lake.

Irresistible food for thought.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4Y85-rexgk

(for other language subs please link here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNrOUUnF06Y)

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Encounters.

In All, Musings, Spirit on April 13, 2013 at 8:20 am

Encounters.

Sometimes an encounter with another human being has an otherworldly quality.

Like coming across a moonscape drenched in soft pink light in a dream tucked in a dream.

Everything one normally thinks, feels and does becomes appropriately suspended so as to create a space arranged by sacred geometry for the experience to unfold.

And it unfolds slowly.

Beginning from a central point, extending in all directions at once.

image source: http://favim.com/image/356894/

To Keep What is Yours

In Music, Spirit on April 1, 2013 at 5:55 am

sunflower-611-14Omnia Sol Temperat (The Sun Warms Everything).

The 4th movement of Carmina Burana’s score, written by Carl Orff in 1937.

Sung by the great lyric baritone Fischer-Dieskau.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=HmiGc0uY5xo

The Lyrics in Latin:

Omnia sol temperat
purus et subtilis,
novo mundo reserat
faciem Aprilis,
ad amorem properat
animus herilis
et iocundis imperat
deus puerilis.

Rerum tanta novitas
in solemni vere
et veris auctoritas
jubet nos gaudere;
vias prebet solitas,
et in tuo vere
fides est et probitas
tuum retinere.

Ama me fideliter,
fidem meam nota:
de corde totaliter
et ex mente tota
sum presentialitar
absens in remota,
quisquis amat taliter,
volvitur in rota.

The Lyrics in English:

The sun warms everything,
pure and gentle,
once again it reveals to the world
April’s face,
the soul of man
is urged towards love
and joys are governed
by the boy-god.

All this rebirth
in spring’s festivity
and spring’s power
bids us to rejoice;
it shows us paths we know well,
and in your springtime
it is true and right
to keep what is yours.

Love me faithfully!
See how I am faithful:
with all my heart
and with all my soul,
I am with you
even when I am far away.
Whosoever loves this much
turns on the wheel.

image source: http://www.deshow.net/flowers/sunflower-pictures-611.html#pic

Thunder over Wind. Constancy. 32.

In All, Books etc., Culture, Spirit on March 21, 2013 at 1:50 pm

32.CONSTANCY

Constancy is to have strength of character in both giddy and weeping times. The Oracle extends this idea to relationships. A true relationship needs constancy. This hexagram symbolizes an enduring marriage, with the husband providing leadership (thunder) and the wife providing a gentle, all-permeating influence (wind). The two trigrams are united to form a single hexagram, just as a husband and wife must remain steadily united. If that happens, their marriage will have all the qualities of heng : it will be constant, regular, persevering, enduring, and continuous.

Marriage’s strength begins with a vow. There is a significant message for all who want to base “reality” in material things. Nothing about any material object or either person’s body changes with a marriage ceremony, and yet, from that moment on, two people agree to one of the clearest points of change possible. What happens? All that happens is that two people make a covenant with one another. They promise to love each other, no matter how much their lives change, no matter how much fortune or misfortune visits them. They promise to face life together, even if demands separate them temporarily. They promise to respect their differences, and to find strength in their similarities. By giving unselfishly to each other, each one is strengthened in a way that neither could ever accomplish on his or her own.

Marriage is not a melding of one person into another. It is the joining of one person with another—two people who remain individuals and yet are joined by a simple promise. It is the challenge, the honour, and the beauty of that one promise withstanding every adversity known to human life. It takes two people to make a vessel large enough and strong enough to hold all the joy and happiness that come to a marriage: the sharing, the communication, the delights, the pleasures. It is the thrill of working for a home and family, and the joy of seeing daughters and sons carry on in the ultimate expression of their constancy.

The constancy required is not stubborn clinging to one position. Rather, we must have a constancy of heart and spirit. It means we have to know ourselves, and remain steady. A boat may navigate both placid lake and twisting rapid, but it does not lose its shape or cease to float.

Constancy in change means grasping the truth about yourself and your situation. It means always being honest with yourself and your mate. Without that truth—measured solely by the standard of your commitment— there is no constancy, and thus, nothing enduring.

Commitment comes first in all essential things, and then only constant cleaving to truth will nurture our promise into duration. What does it mean to be constant if the world is in constant flux? The usual message of the Oracle is that we must be flexible and conform to the will of heaven. The idea of constancy, however, seems contrary to that. Yet t h e Changes urges us to find a constancy that can withstand the overpowering pressures of change.

The Statement reminds us to be steadfast and ethical, to have the will to pursue right even when surrounded by vile people, and to serve others. In these ways, you must be constant. In a world where opportunities come and go, and where there is both good fortune and misfortune, it is only the person of quiet determination who can persevere long enough to prevail. We cannot afford any flagging. The pursuit of a goal must be steady and unswerving. Only then can we continue, find gain through purity of character, and press toward our destinations.

The Image leaves us with a picture of the wise one standing firm, refusing to change direction no matter how forceful the thunder and wind might be. That is an intriguing counterpoint to the usual wisdom of yielding, and it is also a standard for everything that we do: can we choose a position that is worth standing firm for, no matter what comes?

Fleeing, huddling, even crawling may seem easier that standing firm. Yet those who understand change know that what is easiest may not be the correct choice. To stand in constancy, and what is more, to stand hand in hand with another, is a constancy of spiritual dimensions.

Deng Ming-Dao, The Living I Ching, Hexagram 32. 

the zen is truly mightier than the sword.

In All, Spirit on February 28, 2013 at 11:23 pm

the zen is truly mightier than the sword.

In a state of no boundaries, no code, the zen is truly mightier than the sword.

Or is it?

For days now I haven’t written. I am looking for the abiding place and the interval into which not even a hair can be entered as described in the writings of Takuan Soho.

Enlightened master swordsman, philosopher, gardener, poet & man of cutting wit. Born in Japan in 1573.

Three essays put together make up The Unfettered Mind. Writings of the Zen Master to the Sword Master.

You can find the english translation here.

Must read in its entirety.

*Depicted above is Yamaoka Tesshū, famous samurai of the Bakumatsu period.